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PATTERNS OF INTELLIGENCE

    By Robert W. Duffy
    St. Louis Post-Dispatch
    July 11, 1996
    Section: GET OUT
    Edition: FIVE STAR LIFT
    Page 25

Guy Angelo Wilson's drawings at Elliot Smith are handsome and intelligent. From far away, they look like old-master studies of the anatomy, especially the human head. Up close, you find that the drawings are patterns of the kind used to cut out material for garments and hats. Often, there is a correspondence -- views of the head from various perspectives, for example, on a pattern for a hat. But even when such an easy relationship is not stated, there is the interesting and pervasive juxtaposition of the unpredictable human body and the rigid predictability of the pattern.

In an interesting twist, Wilson has created an installation made from rigid cardboard boxes that have been soaked, then bound with wire, and filled with plaster to steady them. Called "Just Containers,'' these forms, made with the most ordinary of materials, become a small community of enormously expressive figures. There is a certain Japaneseness in their postures, and without going too far out in imagining, the figures looked like a Kabuki drama dance sequence. The figures, which the artist calls Pod Forms, appear to have been frozen in the midst of movement. Despite the stiffness and commonness of the materials of which they are made, the figures are graceful and have a certain elegance as well. A good job was done illuminating them: the light heightens the sense of drama.

In addition to Wilson's commendable drawings and sculptures, the gallery has a show made up of recent work by artists in the Elliot Smith "stable.'' One especially powerful painting in this group is Richard Knight's abstract painting, "Portage." There is, however, good, interesting work throughout the show.

Just Containers: an installation by Guy Wilson, with recent

drawings by the artist; and A Group Exhibition by Gallery Artists

Where: Elliot Smith Contemporary Art, 4727 McPherson

When: 10-5:30 Tues.-Sat.; noon-5 p.m. Sun.; through Sept. 1